Dating a person with clinical depression

Suppose you had treatment-resistant depression (or any chronic mental illness), assuming that you had been going the medication-and-therapy route for years to no avail, and that you were doing all you could to help yourself in your condition, but that you were just not able to function on the same level as a healthy person (i.e., too unstable to keep a job, on social assistance, disability status, etc.).

Assume also that you had had this condition your entire adult life and did not expect to get better any time soon–unless there was a significant breakthrough in the field of antidepressants or therapy techniques. How would you find a partner who would accept that you were not healthy and could not have a job or “contribute” to society, but could still love you for you?

After all, 1 in 10 people throughout the world will fall into this category in their lifetime, and the more we pretend we don’t know someone in this group, the more we build on the stigma surrounding it.

Here are some things to think about when it comes to getting into a relationship with someone with depression, anxiety, PTSD, ADHD or similar mental health conditions: As mentioned above, it is likely that you have already encountered someone with mental health problems in your dating life.

Fewer than half of American men who suffer from depression or anxiety seek professional help, according to a U. While an individual must exhibit specific symptoms that meet the criteria for a diagnosis of clinical depression (aka Major Depression or Major Depressive Disorder), depression can occur in varying degrees and manifests in a wide range of symptoms.

A full description can be found in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), which guides mental health professionals in the diagnosis of mental health disorders, such as depression.

) and greater insight into how to take care of both your partner and yourself.

Here are 5 facts you should know about depression: Depression often looks different from one person to another, and symptoms vary between men and women. Women, on the other hand, are more likely to report symptoms of depression, especially during hormonal changes and pregnancy.

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When he falls into a slump, you want to believe that you have the magic to pull him out of it and make him happy.

If your date or your partner is depressed, you’ll see: sad mood; a negative or hopeless outlook for the future; eating too much or too little; crying out of the blue; loss of or low energy; sleeping too much or too little; indecisiveness; and social isolation or withdrawal.

For a bad depression phase, the average episode often lasts six to eight months.

Or if your condition did not improve and you stayed that way your whole life, would you be expected to live a celibate/companion-less life?

Are there any particular pitfalls in dating that depressed people are more susceptible to than healthy people?