Dave longstreth amber coffman dating speed dating in reigate surrey

“It was a surprise to me to learn last September about his album plans, the content, timing, use of the band name, etc.” Coffman said she and Longstreth split in 2012 after a six-year relationship, but patched things up and began working on music again in 2014.The pair recorded City of No Reply at Longstreth’s studio in 2015, but as the musician wrote, “things took an unfortunate downturn around the completion of my record, at which time we stopped speaking.” Coffman has yet to announce a release date for City of No Reply."It was a surprise to me to learn last September about his album plans, the content, timing, use of the band name, etc."Coffman said she and Longstreth split in 2012 after a six-year relationship, but patched things up and began working on music again in 2014.The pair recorded City of No Reply at Longstreth's studio in 2015, but as the musician wrote, "things took an unfortunate downturn around the completion of my record, at which time we stopped speaking."Coffman has yet to announce a release date for City of No Reply.On "Up in Hudson," a sample of Peggy Seeger's folk-song reading of "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" gets pitched up into cartoon territory.Remarkably, the humor and the heartbreak coexist beautifully.To be sure, it's a breakup record – presumably involving Longstreth's relationship with ex-Projector Amber Coffman. Once defined by talented female singers (Coffman foremost), the band is down to one lonely dude crooning into a digital hall of mirrors."Now I'm listening to Kanye on the Taconic Parkway, riding fast," Longstreth reflects on "Up in Hudson," envisioning an ex "out in Echo Park blasting Tupac, drinkin' a fifth for my ass." Longstreth may be lonely, but he isn't alone, and his collaborators push him to new heights.

On "Keep Your Name," Longstreth warbles like a chipmunk-soul Eeyore, then delivers a rap that name-checks Naomi Klein and "Kiss' shithead Gene Simmons." On "Death Spiral," the metaphor is manifested via the score from Hitchcock's Vertigo.

In person, when we meet at the lobby of his Chelsea hotel, Longstreth is less candid.

He’s clearly trained in answering the curious media’s questions, so instead of directly addressing lyrics like “I don’t know why you abandoned me” and “what I want from art is truth / what you want is fame,” he takes a more generalist approach when asked to talk about Dirty Projectors. I started going out there a bunch doing the Kanye stuff, working on the Amber [Coffman] record. I really love that I’ve been able to build a studio there.

“Dirty Projectors is a BREAKUP ALBUM.” Dave Longstreth’s press materials for his long-running project’s eighth, self-titled album couldn’t be any more specific.

The record’s lyrics are even more unequivocal, with references to abandonment, inter-relationship competition and diverging values.