Relative age dating superposition

It is the measurement itself that causes the object to be limited to a single possibility.

In 1935, Erwin Schrodinger proposed an analogy to show how superposition would operate in the every day world: the somewhat cruel analogy of Schrodinger's cat.

Some rock layers, containing clearly identifiable fossil remains of fish and other forms of aquatic animal and plant life, originally formed in the ocean.

Other layers, consisting of sand grains winnowed clean by the pounding surf, obviously formed as beach deposits that marked the shorelines of ancient seas.

He assumed that the change in styles was an evolutionary one, and, if you could quantify that change, he surmised it might be used to indicate which cemeteries were older than others.

Petrie knew that styles of pottery seemed to come and go over time--in his case, he noted that some ceramic urns from the graves had handles and others had just stylized ridges in the same location on similarly shaped urns.

Radiocarbon dating is one kind of radiometric dating, used for determining the age of organic remains that are less than 50,000 years old.

For inorganic matter and for older materials, isotopes of other elements, such as potassium, uranium, and strontium, are used.

Their studies show, for example, that during a particular episode the land surface was raised in one part of the world to form high plateaus and mountain ranges.

After the uplift of the land, the forces of erosion attacked the highlands and the eroded rock debris was transported and redeposited in the lowlands.